How is short leave granted?

Convicts, with the exception of those convicted for particularly dangerous repeat offences or particularly grave crimes, may be granted short term leaves in exceptional personal situations (such as the death or serious life-threatening disease of close relatives, or a natural disaster that has caused considerable material damage upon the convict or his or her family) or for purposes of social rehabilitation.

Short leaves are granted for up to seven days, excluding the time required for leaving and returning, which may not exceed three days.

A convict serving punishment at an open correctional institution may be granted, for the purpose of social rehabilitation, a short leave for up to one month, excluding the time required for leaving and returning, which may not exceed three days.

A convict serving punishment at an open correctional institution may be granted short term leave for not more than six times in the course of the year, and a convict serving punishment at a semi-open, semi-closed or closed correctional institution — not more than twice in the course of the year.

A convict who is negatively characterised may be granted a short term leave only if he or she is accompanied by a representative or representatives of a correctional institution.

A request for granting short term leave due to personal emergencies is reviewed within one day, and for the purposes of social rehabilitation, the request is reviewed within a three-day period.

Detained persons, except for persons accused of particularly grave crimes, may be granted short leaves in case of death or serious life-threatening disease of close relatives, natural disaster that caused considerable material damage to the detainee or his or her family. Short leaves are granted upon the decision of the body implementing criminal proceedings.

A person who avoids returning to the correctional institution within the prescribed time period shall be subject to criminal liability.